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NODALETO BY JULIA TOLEDANO

NODALETO BY JULIA TOLEDANO

NODALETO BY JULIA TOLEDANO

Discover NODALETO boots and shoes by Julia ToledanoDiscover NODALETO boots and shoes by Julia Toledano

NODALETO

 BY JULIA TOLEDANO

“From Venice to Venice” is how Julia Toledano describes the creative process behind her new shoe collection Nodaleto. Launched during Paris Fashion Week in March, the first collection was designed in Venice Beach, California, where Toledano spends half her time, and produced in some of the finest factories in Venice, Italy.

As much as the West Coast is evident in the shoes’ aesthetic (Western-inspired boots with spurs, Sixties-ish lace-up booties with chunky heels, and an Italian hand in the quality of the leather and craftmanship), there’s a lot of natural Parisian attitude to the line. For example, the “Babies Bulla” is a platform Mary Jane with a chunky, triangular heel, for which she did an exclusive style for The Webster. “They’re more feminine and minimal,” says Toledano, noting that every shoe in the collection is named “Bulla” for the iconic Palais Bulles or Bubble Palace in the South of France, designed by architect Antti Lovag and purchased by Pierre Cardin as a vacation home.

 

Toledano grew up in Paris. Fashion is in her family. Her father Sidney Toledano is the chairman and CEO of the LVMH Fashion Group and has been with the company since Toledano was born. She grew up going to fashion shows — “You can ask my mother, she will tell you my eyes would only see and focus on the shoes,” she says — but it was a hobby until she enrolled in a fashion and accessories program two years ago. She began working on Nodaleto a year ago with her partner Olivier Leone, who oversees the brand identity. The vibe is “Americano Mediterranneo Minimalism” and is largely influenced by the Nineties, when Toledano was born, as well as the Sixties and Seventies. Nodaleto is a nickname variation on Toledano, a reversal of the syllables. “It was really important to have my legacy and name and heritage, the story of Spain and Morocco [where her family is from],” she says. “But not call it Julia Toledano.”

Nor did she want to call on her father for too much advice, limiting his input to production. “I wanted to show him the product at the very end, so I invited him to the showroom when the collection was done,” says Toledano. “I prefer that he’s in the back. I want to have my own thing on my own and express my own personality.”