ELECTRIC FEEL: THE HISTORY OF NEON

From art and fashion to sport and rave, discover the electrifying effects of the color neon.

ELECTRIC FEEL: THE HISTORY OF NEON

SPOTLIGHT ON:

NEON

From art and fashion to sport and rave, discover the electrifying effects of the color neon.

 

Valentino Spring/Summer 2020

 

Versace Fall/Winter 2020

Originating from Miami, The Webster has a particular anity for all things colorful, especially neon hues. Bright colors lead our fashion and design curation, and they are an integral part of our architecture and visual identity. From our Art Deco outpost in South Beach to Kahlil Joseph’s art installation at our Los Angeles flagship, The Webster references fluorescent colors through art, design, fashion, and architecture.

 

Dan Flavin for Calvin Klein

 

Bottega Veneta Fall/Winter 2020

NNeon lights, developed by French inventor Georges Claude in 1910, shortly became an innovative, impactful, and aordable way to promote brands and city nightlife. By the 1920s, neon signs lit up all major metropolitan cities, as advertising signs appeared everywhere. Artists started experimenting with the medium in the 1930s– French artist Martial Raysse became one of the first artists to work with neon, and Andy Warhol described neon as 'one of the great modern things.' The 1960s saw the decay of neon advertising, which paradoxically compelled progressive artists such as Keith Sonnier, Joseph Kosuth, and Dan Flavin to experiment with the medium.

 

Madonna

 

Andre Agassi

Neon lights, developed by French inventor Georges Claude in 1910, shortly became an innovative, impactful, and aordable way to promote brands and city nightlife. By the 1920s, neon signs lit up all major metropolitan cities, as advertising signs appeared everywhere. Artists started experimenting with the medium in the 1930s– French artist Martial Raysse became one of the first artists to work with neon, and Andy Warhol described neon as 'one of the great modern things.' The 1960s saw the decay of neon advertising, which paradoxically compelled progressive artists such as Keith Sonnier, Joseph Kosuth, and Dan Flavin to experiment with the medium.

 

Mary Weatherford

 

Versace Fall/Winter 2020

The 1980s saw an appetite for ultra-bright colors, partly as a reaction to the muted color palette of the 1970s. Between the bright tennis attire of Andre Agassi to the casual fashion of Madonna, celebrities embraced the neon trend just as much as the public.

 

Loewe Paula’s Ibiza shot by Gray Sorrenti

In the 1990s, neon went from mainstream to counterculture. Rave kids from Europe adopted the hues in their clothes and into graphic design and club culture at large: glow sticks and bright yellow smiley 'acid' faces were everywhere.

 

Balenciaga Fall/Winter 2020

 

Dan Flavin

Today neon is back, stronger than ever, in art and fashion. From neon accents as seen in Jacquemus and Louis Vuitton accessories, to electrifying full looks at Balenciaga and Versace, neon proves to be surprisingly adaptable to trends and seasons.

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