WEBSTER SOUNDWAVES: RICHIE TALBOY

Photographer Richie Talboy takes us around Paris with his playlist for this weekend. From an ice skating rink in the Grand Palais to five-euro glasses of wine, discover Paris as Richie recalls his memories of the city.

WEBSTER SOUNDWAVES: RICHIE TALBOY

WEBSTER SOUNDWAVES

LE GRAND PALAIS

CURATED BY RICHIE TALBOY

Photographer Richie Talboy takes us around Paris with his playlist for this weekend. From an ice skating rink in the Grand Palais to five-euro glasses of wine, discover Paris as Richie recalls his memories of the city

“I was 21 when I took a trip to Paris to do odd jobs documenting runway shows, not expecting to find myself one night, in the Grand Palais on an ice skating rink.”

RT:

“I had no idea that the space was used for such a reason, and it’s something that still baffles me today. Skating around the emerald and glass structure–one seared so deeply into my brain as the backdrop to countless Chanel shows, I placed myself in the shoes [skates] of Karl–arms linked with Gisele as mine were my skate partner. A mix of distraction and inexperience left me with bruises on my tailbone and knees. Slipped Disc by LizziyMercier Descloux unfortunately wasn’t what was playing on the ice, but it still brings back the memory.”

 

Mel Ramos, Martini Miss #2, 2004

 

Mel Ramos, Vantage, 1935

TW:

Do particular images remind you of the songs in your playlist?

RT:

“Mel Ramos’ artwork reminds me of Tut Tut Tut Tut by Gillian Hills. Both have that same kind of plasticine, high-femme temperament. They remind me of the bizarre, faded advertisements I’d see walking in Paris, but even more uncanny.

Also bizarre; the placement of a miniature version of the Eiffel Tower within the Grand Palais itself–complete with clouds shrouding the top. I think these songs make me feel quite generally out of place, a running theme. Almost a dream of being in Paris rather than actual Paris. Thus the Inception screenshot as well.”

TW:

What are your favorite sounds of Paris?

RT:

Absolutely the language–the way every word flows into one another. I’ve tried to master it countless times but I can never get a full grasp

TW:

What inspired this playlist?

RT:

Percolator by Stereolab was a song I’d listen to getting dressed for meetings in Summer last year. Feeling cute, walking through the Le Marais to a meeting at Le Progrès to show my book and give them the cookie I brought. Then play it again walking home after drinking great wine that’s only five euros a glass.

TW:

What role do music and sound play when you are working on concepts and photographing?

RT:

I love making a playlist before shooting, but the music doesn’t always lend itself to the mood the way I imagine when I create them beforehand. It’s important to let things unfold on set and not be too prescriptive before creating work. Luckily, my boyfriend is a DJ and always knows what to play. He often comes to set with me, but he’s always afraid to hurt someone’s feelings when I ask him to change another person’s music choice.

TW:

In your point of view, what are the similarities and contrasts between photography and music?

RT:

It’s hard for me to say. I’m so actively involved in photography but with music I’m just a spectator. I used to play guitar and sing as a prepubescent, perhaps if I were a heterosexual I would’ve taken that career path. I think both have the ability to take references both literally and figuratively. I mean, the sampling of disco in Daft Punk’s music comes to mind as a sort of parallel to Meisel referencing Alex Katz.

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